KGOU

Anastasia Tsioulcas

Anastasia Tsioulcas is a reporter for NPR Music. She covers breaking news in the music industry, as well as a wide range of musical genres and artists, for NPR's flagship news programs and NPR Music.

Tsioulcas is intensely interested in the arts at the intersection of culture, politics, economics, and identity. She covers #MeToo and gender issues in the music industry, as well as the effects of US immigration and travel policy on musicians and other performers traveling to this country.

She has reported from the funeral of Aretha Franklin, profiled musicians and dancers in contemporary Cuba, and brought listeners into the creative process of composers Steve Reich and Terry Riley.

Tsioulcas also produces episodes for NPR Music's much-lauded Tiny Desk concert series, and has hosted live concerts from venues like the Metropolitan Museum of Art and New York's (Le) Poisson Rouge. She has also commissioned and produced several world premieres on behalf of NPR Music, including a live event that brought together 350 musicians on the steps of the Brooklyn Public Library.

As a video producer, she has created high-profile video shorts for NPR Music, including performances by cellist Yo-Yo Ma in a Brooklyn theatrical props warehouse and pianist Yuja Wang in an icy-cold Steinway & Sons piano factory in Queens.

Tsioulcas has reported from across Europe, north and west Africa, south Asia, and Cuba for NPR and other outlets. Prior to joining NPR in 2011, she was widely published as a writer and critic on both classical and world music, and was the North America editor for Gramophone Magazine and the classical music columnist for Billboard.

Born in Boston, Tsioulcas was trained from an early age as a classical violinist and violist. She holds a B.A. from Barnard College, Columbia University in comparative religion.

Fifty years after the original Woodstock Music & Art Fair promised "three days of peace and music," one of its original organizers announced Wednesday that he is putting together Woodstock 50 for this summer. The event will be held over three days — Aug. 16-18 — on a 1,000-acre green space in Watkins Glen in upstate New York, near the Finger Lakes.

The mood at the Drama Book Shop on Tuesday morning was giddy relief. Faced with a big rent increase, the beloved New York City store — which has served the theater community for more than 100 years, and which won its own Tony honor in 2011 for its services to the theater world — was set to close later this month.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LOOK WHAT YOU MADE ME DO")

TAYLOR SWIFT: (Singing) I don't like your little games, don't like your tilted stage, the role you made me play...

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

One of the legends of country music, guitarist and singer Roy Clark, has died. Clark, a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame and the Grand Ole Opry, was beloved by generations of fans for his work on the TV show Hee Haw, which he joined in 1969, acting as joyful co-host for nearly a quarter century.

The Cleveland Orchestra announced on Wednesday that it has fired two of its prominent musicians on the basis of sexual misconduct: concertmaster William Preucil and principal trombonist Massimo La Rosa.

On Tuesday, the Nashville-based guitar company Gibson Brands announced a crop of new executives who hope to guide the business through a pivotal transition in its 124-year history, as the company emerges from bankruptcy protection. The company's newly named president and CEO is James "JC" Curleigh, who is exiting his role as president of Levi Strauss & Co. to take the position.

On Thursday, Barbra Streisand released a new, very politically focused song: "Don't Lie to Me."

Updated 11:35 a.m. Sep. 20 with portions of a statement from Ticketmaster in response to the CBC and Toronto Star's reporting.

The popular streaming service Spotify has pulled some content posted by the prominent conspiracy theorist Alex Jones, founder of the website Infowars.

Spotify did not specify which episodes had been deleted, or how many in total it had removed from its service.

On Tuesday, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) announced that it has settled its claims against the founder of the failed Fyre Festival, Billy McFarland. The commission accused McFarland of defrauding more than 100 investors out of $27.4 million. McFarland has admitted to the SEC's charges against him.

One of Broadway's hottest tickets is coming to small screens: "Springsteen on Broadway" will be launched as a Netflix special this December.

The one-man show, which was written by Bruce Springsteen, earned him a Tony Award in June. Directed and produced by Thom Zimny, it has been a sensation in New York, where it's been seen by intimate audiences of less than 1,000 people per show at the Walter Kerr Theatre.

Updated at 5:04 p.m. ET

Just after the second half of yesterday's World Cup final between France and Croatia had begun, four people dressed in Russian police uniforms briefly disrupted the game. On social media, Pussy Riot took responsibility for the protest.

Boston Symphony Orchestra principal flutist Elizabeth Rowe has filed a lawsuit against the orchestra, claiming that she is making substantially less each year than her closest peer — a man.

In a suit filed Friday by the Metropolitan Opera, five men have made newly public accusations against conductor and pianist James Levine, who was closely associated with the Met for four decades. In total, nine men have now come forward, either by name or anonymously, with accusations against Levine.

Activists have been trying since last summer to get the music industry to sever its ties to R&B singer R. Kelly, following years of allegations from women who say the singer sexually and emotionally abused them.

The company behind the iconic Gibson guitars — whose instruments have been played by Les Paul, B.B. King and Jimmy Page, among many others — filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in Delaware. The Nashville, Tenn.-based corporation's current properties also include Baldwin Piano, Gibson Pro Audio and Wurlitzer, a company once famous for its organs but whose brand name Gibson now uses only for manufacturing jukeboxes.

This month, the German music industry has been forced to reckon with accusations of anti-Semitism after a controversial rap duo, Kollegah (Felix Blume) and Farid Bang (Farid El Abellaoui), won the best hip-hop album award at the Echo prizes, the country's top music award, on April 12.

Pages