Asma Khalid | KGOU
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Asma Khalid

The secretary of the Senate's office said on Monday that it cannot comply with former Vice President Joe Biden's request to search for and release any records of an alleged sexual harassment complaint from Tara Reade.

On Friday, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee had formally written to Secretary of the Senate Julie Adams asking for help in determining whether Reade had filed a written complaint 27 years ago, as she says she did while working as a staff assistant in Biden's Senate office.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Yesterday, Joe Biden strongly denied allegations of sexual assault from a former staffer. But he also had to square his denial with an idea he supported in the era of #MeToo - to believe women.

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

It's been more than a month now since a former Senate staffer of Joe Biden accused the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee of sexually assaulting her back in 1993. Today, Biden responded personally for the first time. He spoke to MSNBC.

Updated at 5:59 p.m. ET

Editor's note: This story contains graphic descriptions of an alleged sexual assault.

More than a month after being publicly accused of sexual assault by a former Senate staffer in the 1990s, former Vice President Joe Biden says the allegations "aren't true. This never happened."

Editor's note: This story contains graphic descriptions of an alleged sexual assault.

Updated at 12:56 p.m. ET

New information has emerged in recent days about a sexual assault allegation against the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, Joe Biden, made by Tara Reade, a former staff assistant in Biden's Senate office. For the first time, someone has gone on the record to say that Reade detailed the allegation to her decades ago in the same way Reade is describing it now.

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

"Nobody has been tougher on China than me," President Trump proclaimed at Tuesday's coronavirus briefing.

When the Trump administration has been criticized for how it has handled the coronavirus outbreak, the president has been inclined at times to blame the Chinese and then accuse his Democratic opponent Joe Biden of being "weak on China."

Biden's campaign has been trying to turn that argument back on Trump, seeing lots of material to work with as the president has touted an improved trading relationship with China.

Editor's note: This story contains a graphic description of an alleged sexual assault.

Tara Reade, a former junior staffer in Joe Biden's Senate office, has accused the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee of sexually assaulting her in 1993, when she was working as a staff assistant. The Biden campaign denies the accusation and says the alleged incident "absolutely did not happen."

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Bernie Sanders dropped out of the presidential race last week. And today he made his support for his former rival Joe Biden clear.

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In February 2009, the country was in the midst of the worst economic downturn it had experienced since the Great Depression. Unemployment was over 8%, job losses were widespread, and economic anxiety was spreading.

Congress passed a massive economic rescue package, just as it has to avoid economic peril from the coronavirus outbreak, known as the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. It included tax cuts, expanded unemployment support, infrastructure projects and money for a range of Democratic domestic priorities, such as green jobs and high-speed rail.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Joe Biden won the Democratic primaries. Now, his campaign is getting to work trying to win over progressives within his own party. NPR's Asma Khalid reports.

A day after Bernie Sanders dropped out of the presidential race, Joe Biden, now the presumptive Democratic nominee, made an overture to progressives.

On Thursday he rolled out two new policy proposals:

  1. Lower the age of Medicare eligibility from 65 to 60.
  2. Forgive student debt for low-income and middle-class families who attended public colleges and universities and some private institutions.

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Bernie Sanders dropped out of the presidential race today. Here's the Vermont senator speaking to supporters via livestream video.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Updated at 6:06 p.m. ET

President Trump and his likely Democratic opponent Joe Biden spoke about the country's response to the coronavirus pandemic on Monday, a conversation that had been discussed between the two sides since last week.

After Bernie Sanders suffered three straight weeks of big losses across the country, the Vermont senator returned home to "assess his campaign."

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Joe Biden is a classic retail politician — a man who loves to shake hands, give hugs, take selfies and look voters directly in the eye, one-on-one. But now he can't do any of those things.

Instead, because of the coronavirus outbreak, his campaign is grounded: no rallies, no travel. It's all virtual fundraisers, live-streamed speeches, remote TV interviews, Facebook videos and volunteer Slack channels.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Former Vice President Joe Biden spoke out today on the coronavirus epidemic and attacked the man he hopes to replace in the White House.

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Former New York Mayor Mike Bloomberg has decided against creating a super PAC that was expected to spend unlimited sums to take on President Trump and instead is transferring $18 million to the Democratic National Committee.

"While we considered creating our own independent entity to support the nominee and hold the president accountable, this race is too important to have many competing groups with good intentions but that are not coordinated and united in strategy and execution," Bloomberg's team wrote in a memo to Tom Perez, the chairman of the DNC.

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