KGOU

Caroline Halter

KGOU Producer/Reporter

Caroline produces Capitol Insider and does general assignment reporting. She joins KGOU from Marfa Public Radio, where she covered a wide range of local and regional issues in far west Texas. Previously, she reported on state politics for KTOO Public Media in Alaska and various outlets in Washington State.

Caroline has a bachelor’s degree in international studies from Seattle University and speaks Spanish proficiently. As part of her degree, she edited for a Tibetan newspaper in Northern India and conducted independent research in rural Kenya.

When Caroline’s not producing radio, she’s usually listening to it! To keep up with Caroline’s stories and programs, follow her on Twitter: @carolinehalter.

Ways to Connect

Dick Pryor/KGOU

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley speak with Glen Johnson about his thirteen years leading Oklahoma's higher education system and his plan to retire next year. 

AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley speak with the head of Oklahoma's higher education system, Glen Johnson. Johnson discusses budget cuts to higher education, as well as free speech policies, virtual education and more. 

Two of Oklahoma’s largest tribes, Osage Nation and Muscogee (Creek) Nation, are moving in opposite directions when it comes to freedom of the press. 

AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU's Dick Pryor interviews U.S. Rep. Kendra Horn about the possible impeachment of President Donald Trump. Horn is one of a few House Democrats who has not backed the impeachment inquiry launched Sept. 24. 

AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki

 

Kendra Horn represents Oklahoma’s fifth congressional district, and she is one of a small group of Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives who does not support the impeachment inquiry into President Trump’s relations with Ukraine.

Wikimedia Commons

Oklahoma lawmakers are preparing for redistricting in 2021, but how does the process actually work? University of Oklahoma political scientist Keith Gaddie explains how census data, computers and bargaining come together to make new political maps. 

Capitol Restoration Project

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley discuss several public employee pay raise requests and the state's maintenance backlog. Both could complicate the upcoming budgeting process.

Investigations Into Epic Charter Schools Explained

Sep 13, 2019

From TV and radio ads to the steady flow of news stories, it has been difficult to ignore Epic Charter Schools lately. With multiple ongoing investigations into the school’s finances and enrollment, here is a comprehensive look at what has transpired and what it could mean for future state policy.

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley discuss the most recent developments in the effort to stop Oklahoma's permitless carry law from taking effect Nov. 1, as well as a proposal that would ban so-called "red flag laws" in the state. 

Sean Murphy / AP

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley discuss the last minute effort to stop Oklahoma's permitless carry law from going into effect, the opioid ruling against Johnson & Johnson, and more. 

Monta Johnson, a fifth-grade teacher at Adams Elementary School, passes out books to her class in Oklahoma City on August 3, 2016.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

As the new school year gets underway, Oklahoma’s teacher shortage persists. The state is on track to set a new record for the number of emergency certified teachers in K-12 classrooms. 

Caroline Halter / KGOU

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU's Dick Pryor speaks with Republican Congressman Tom Cole. The two discuss immigration policy, national gun control efforts, what he thinks about Oklahoma's Medicaid expansion effort, and support for President Trump heading into 2020. 

Phil Gover is Sovereign Community School’s founder.
Caroline Halter / StateImpact Oklahoma

 

Sovereign Community School is new charter school in Oklahoma City with a focus on Native American cultures and identities. It’s also part of a movement of tribes and tribal citizens using publicly funded, privately run schools to take control over how their children are educated. 

Pixabay

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley discuss a last minute effort to repeal Oklahoma's newest gun law and more. 

Bobak Ha'Eri

Native children are far more likely to end up in state custody, and the Indian Child Welfare Act aims to keep them within Indigenous communities. Last fall, a federal district judge in Texas ruled ICWA was unconstitutional, calling it a “race-based law.” But on Friday the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals reversed that decision.

Kevin Stitt is shown speaking at a forum hosted by Edmond Republican Women on May 21.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

This is part two of our most recent conversation with Gov. Stitt. He shares his thoughts on Medicaid expansion and the investigations into the state's largest virtual charter school. 

Gov. Kevin Stitt describes how he plans to implement campgin promises.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

Tribal gaming negotiations got off to a rough start last month. Now, Gov. Stitt is responding to pushback and explains why he thinks tribes should pay more for the exclusive rights to operate casino games in Oklahoma.

peggydavis66 / Flickr.com

Twenty-nine tribal leaders sent a letter to Gov. Stitt saying they “stand united” when it comes to Oklahoma’s Gaming Compact. The letter followed the governor’s announcement in early July that he wants to renegotiate the agreement, which allows tribes to operate casino games in exchange for giving the state a percentage of their revenue through “exclusivity fees.”

Dick Pryor/KGOU

Gov. Kevin Stitt announced his intention to renegotiate Oklahoma's gaming compacts, the agreements governing Indian gaming in the state, through an op-ed earlier this month. Matthew Morgan, who leads the Oklahoma Indian Gaming Association, discusses how tribes have reacted to the governor's approach and what they need from him to play ball. 

A sign is seen outside of 50 Penn Place in Oklahoma City, where Epic Charter Schools leases 40,000 square feet for administrative use.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

Oklahoma investigators believe Epic Charter Schools embezzled money by inflating its enrollment with homeschool and private school students. Because of the state’s dedication to privacy, State Superintendent of Public Instruction Joy Hofmeister says the alleged abuse would not have been preventable under current state law.

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