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Ted Robbins

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The Los Angeles County District Attorney announced six new felony sex crime charges Friday against former movie producer and convicted rapist Harvey Weinstein. DA Jackie Lacey's office accused Weinstein of an additional three counts each of felony forcible rape and forcible oral copulation involving two alleged victims.

Ken Osmond was a character actor known, really, for one character. He played Eddie Haskell on the 1950s and '60s TV sitcom Leave It to Beaver. But that character became a TV type.

Osmond's son Eric told The Hollywood Reporter that his father died. "He was an incredibly kind and wonderful father," his son said in a statement Monday. "He had his family gathered around him when he passed. He was loved and will be very missed."

Magician and animal trainer Roy Horn, of the legendary Las Vegas duo Siegfried and Roy, died Friday from complications related to COVID-19. Horn tested positive last week. He was 75.

"The world has lost one of the greats of magic, but I have lost my best friend," Siegfried Fischbacher said of his partner in a statement.

It's powwow season — the time of year when across the country, Native American tribes should be getting together to celebrate their culture with food, dancing, singing and drumming. Kay Oxendine is a member of the Haliwa Saponi Tribe in North Carolina.

"Every year we know it's coming; like, the birds sing differently," she told NPR. "It's almost like spring arrives when the powwow does."

Opera fans are mourning one of the world's most revered voices.

Soprano Jessye Norman died Monday morning at Mount Sinai St. Luke's Hospital in New York. Her death was confirmed to NPR by a spokesperson for her family, Gwendolyn Quinn, as well as a representative from the Jessye Norman School of the Arts. The official cause of death was septic shock and multi-organ failure, secondary to complications of a spinal cord injury she had sustained in 2015. She was 74.

D.A. Pennebaker, a pioneering filmmaker who chronicled key moments in music as well as politics, has died at age 94. Pennebaker helped create the cinéma vérité, or direct cinema style of documentary.

He died on Aug. 1 of natural causes at his home in Sag Harbor, New York. His son, Frazer Pennebaker, confirmed his death with NPR.

In 2012, Pennebaker received an honorary Oscar, for being a filmmaker "who redefined the language of film and taught a generation of filmmakers to look to reality for inspiration."

Crowds around the world flow through the buildings designed by architect I.M. Pei; in Paris, they stream into the Louvre's Pyramid entrance. In Cleveland, they wander through the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. And in Hong Kong, they travel up and down the soaring Bank of China Tower.

Pei's death was confirmed by Thomas Guss, his press contact. He was 102.

His designs were widely praised — but not always at first. When his large glass pyramid opened at the entrance to the Louvre museum in 1989, it was not well received.

Updated at 12:10 p.m. ET

Aretha Franklin, the "Queen of Soul," died Thursday in her home city of Detroit after battling pancreatic cancer of the neuroendocrine type. Her death was confirmed by her publicist, Gwendolyn Quinn. She was 76.

Franklin sold more than 75 million records during her life, making her one of the best-selling artists of all time. She took soul to a new level and inspired generations of singers who came after her.

Updated at 6:30 p.m. ET

The New Yorker magazine has published an article by Ronan Farrow detailing accusations of sexual harassment by CBS CEO Les Moonves and other men at the company.

Do you see a blue dress or a gold dress? Well, this time it's a green Zara jacket. And the color doesn't matter — it's what's written on the back in big white graffiti lettering: "I REALLY DON'T CARE, DO U?"

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And we're seeing more fallout in the entertainment industry following sex-abuse allegations against movie mogul Harvey Weinstein. People in Hollywood are asking some tough questions about how to change the industry. Here's NPR's Ted Robbins.

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These are words you will not hear again at the Oscars.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

GWYNETH PALTROW: I would like to thank Harvey Weinstein.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein is taking a leave of absence from his company following a New York Times story that he sexually harassed female assistants, executives and actresses for decades. The Times report also says Weinstein settled complaints with at least eight women.

Trump Pardons Arpaio

Aug 26, 2017

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President Trump dropped a big, fat hint Tuesday night in a speech in Phoenix.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: I'll make a prediction. I think he's going to be just fine, OK?

(APPLAUSE)

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It's been a mediocre summer so far for Hollywood box office numbers - down about 11 percent from last summer. But one movie has had remarkable staying power.

(SOUNDBITE OF RUPERT GREGSON-WILLIAMS' "WONDER WOMAN'S WRATH")

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TV and film writers resumed contract negotiations Tuesday with Hollywood producers with a powerful bargaining tool. Late Monday, the Writers Guild of America said members had overwhelmingly authorized a strike if an agreement is not reached by May 1. That's when the current contract runs out.

More than 90 percent of eligible writers voted to authorize a strike, even though the last strike a decade ago cost some writers their jobs and shut down TV and movie production.

Before Comedy Central's celebrity roasts, before American Idol's Simon Cowell, before Triumph the Insult Comic Dog, one man abused people on TV and in clubs like no other — as one emcee introduced him, "the Sultan of Insults, the Merchant of Venom, the pussy cat with claws, Mr. Don Rickles!"

Rickles died of kidney failure Thursday at his home in Los Angeles. He was 90.

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