KGOU

conservation

OU researcher Miranda Vesy holds a Texas horned lizard, often called a horny toad.
Claire Donnelly / KGOU

KGOU listener Gabe Denton remembers seeing horny toads all the time when he was growing up in Choctaw, but he hasn’t seen one in decades. Denton asked How Curious: What happened?

Workers at a site of a pipeline under construction along state Highway 75 north of Horntown.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Today on the Business Intelligence Report, Journal Record senior reporter Sarah Terry-Cobo talks discusses conservation credit programs that are designed to protect the American burying beetle. She also talks about the Choctaw Nation’s recycling efforts.

A tagged Monarch butterfly on a flowering lantana plant at the Oklahoma City.
CARE_SMC / Flickr/CC BY-ND 2.0

Stephanie Henson admires her colorful backyard garden in Edmond. Approaching a pink-and-white plant, she squeals and laughs and she spots some butterflies.

“Oh look, they’re itty-bitty,” she says. “Look at ’em!”

Henson doesn’t know much about gardening, but she’s doing what she can to attract butterflies, which is what conservation specialists and government officials are trying to encourage here in Oklahoma and across the country.

Oklahoma Conservation Commission Executive Director Trey Lam stands on the bank of the Blue River in south-central Oklahoma.  He said budget cuts will result in more staff reductions at the agency.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

The $6.9 billion budget signed last week by Gov. Mary Fallin delivers 5 percent cuts to most state agencies. On paper, it looks like two environmental agencies received funding boosts,  but a closer look at the numbers shows the increases aren’t what they appear.