KGOU

Oklahoma Engaged

Marijuana leaf
Wikimedia Commons

On this episode of Capitol Insider, Dr. Amy Goodin of OU Poll joins KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley to discuss polling and focus groups commissioned for Oklahoma Engaged, a collaboration between NPR member stations in Oklahoma. Goodin talks about the general “disillusionment” of voters throughout the state, as well as some of their ideas about how to fund public education, the leading political concern in the 2018 election cycle.

 

Kurt Gwartney/ Oklahoma Engaged

Oklahoma’s claim to the buckle of the Bible belt is widely accepted as true. But when it comes to faith and voting, new research shows more residents are letting their political values influence the church they choose.

 

At a recent weekly Sunday morning donut hour at Faith United Methodist Church in Tulsa, people are busy talking about the start of school and the college football season while getting their weekly dose of juice, coffee and donuts.

This is the Manager’s Minute.

Labor Day is considered the unofficial launch of the Fall election season, and our Oklahoma Engaged political reporting is now moving full speed toward November.

With funding from the Ethics & Excellence in Journalism Foundation and the Kirkpatrick Foundation, KGOU, StateImpact Oklahoma and our public radio partners created Oklahoma Engaged to serve as a campaign for the people.

Rep. Bobby Cleveland, left, and Sherrie Conley, right.
Oklahoma House of Representatives / Provided

Tuesday is Oklahoma’s primary runoff election and in House District 20, an educator is campaigning to oust Republican incumbent Bobby Cleveland, who’s held the seat for six years.

State Rep. Cyndi Munson walks door-to-door in Nichols Hills, Okla. as she campaigns for reelection.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Sue Campbell and her husband David stand under a tree at a dog park along a busy highway near Lake Hefner. Their dog is here, too — a 3-year-old ball of furry energy named Louie.

“Louie is a miniature schnauzer and Staffordshire terrier mix,” Sue said.

Caroline Halter/KGOU

Tyler Clifton collapses onto a couch after a long day at the furniture store he manages in downtown McAlester. It’s the same couch where he occasionally interviews people for Facebook videos he calls “The McAlester Leadership Series.”

Owner Sylvia Wilson, center, sits with a customer and an employee at Boots Cafe in Taft, Oklahoma.
Quinton Chandler / Oklahoma Engaged

If you follow your nose to the back of Boots Cafe, you’ll run into swinging wood doors hanging underneath a metal script sign of the word ‘Blessed.’

Martha Buehring, a 71-year-old Republican and former military wife, is one of many older Oklahomans who are frustrated with the state budget.
Caroline Halter / Oklahoma Engaged

People over 65 are the most likely to vote. They’re also the group that’s most likely to point to government issues — like mismanaged taxpayer money — as their biggest political concern, according to a poll commissioned by Oklahoma public radio stations.

Democratic candidates and supporters gather for a Democratic Unity picnic at the Wheeler Ferris Wheel grounds in Oklahoma City.
Kateleigh Mills / Oklahoma Engaged

Women are a key constituency for both of Oklahoma’s major political parties, and an increasing number of women are running for office. But data suggest a majority of Oklahoma women are disappointed with both major political parties.

Ryan LaCroix / Oklahoma Engaged

Long before the Tonight Show, late night TV icon Johnny Carson was hosted a game show entitled “Who Do You Trust?”

Katie Stokes

This is the Manager’s Minute.

KGOU has just ended one fiscal year, and begun another.

This has been an eventful year – we’ve added a new transmitter in Clinton, expanded our StateImpact Oklahoma team and dramatically increased our number of weekly listeners.

We’ve launched two new podcasts (How Curious and Capitol Insider) and improved our severe storms and emergency alert system. We've grown our StateImpact Oklahoma reporting and launched the Oklahoma Engaged 2018 election project.

Roy Lenz, a retired farmer, owns the Brandin’ Iron in Laverne, Oklahoma. His bar is in a dry county, so he can only serve low point beer.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Roy Lenz tidies the bar at the Brandin’ Iron on a Saturday afternoon. His wife, Barbara, fires up the grill, filling the place with the smell of hamburger patties, grilled onions and bacon.

“This place was built back in the late 20s, early 30s, and it’s been a bar from the late 30s, early 40s,” Roy said.

Shaunna and Michael Oliver at their home in Mannford, Okla. The couple is voting ‘yes’ on SQ 788 and say medical marijuana will help them with chronic pain from fibromyalgia, diabetes and other conditions.
Jackie Fortier / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma voters on June 26 will decide if the licensed cultivation, use and possession of marijuana for medicinal purposes should be legal.

Some polls suggest State Question 788, which would create a regulatory and licensing system for medical marijuana, is likely to pass, but many Oklahomans like Pam Hayes of Kansas, a small town in the eastern part of the state, intend to vote ‘no.’ 


This is the Manager’s Minute.

Tuesday, June 26th is primary election day across the state of Oklahoma.

Polls open at 7 a.m. and close at 7 p.m.

Interest in elections this year is high – with voting on state house and senate, statewide offices, congress, judges and more.

A state question regarding medical marijuana (SQ 788) is on the primary ballot.

This year, KGOU and our public radio partners will cover politics and elections through an innovative initiative – Oklahoma Engaged: Project Public Office.

Eric Haynes of Ada, Okla., says poorly maintained roads and sidewalks are among the biggest issues his community faces.
Caroline Halter / KGOU

Oklahoma voters will pick their primary candidates on June 26 and weigh in on a state question about legalizing medical marijuana. The political heat will build through the summer with high-profile endorsements, big-money ad blitzes and campaign promises.

This is the Manager’s Minute.

2018 is a monumental election year in Oklahoma. All statewide offices, including governor, are on the ballot, along with judicial, legislative and congressional races.

With so many issues facing the state, interest is high – and we’re meeting that demand with an ambitious and innovative plan for election coverage.

KGOU and StateImpact Oklahoma, along with our public radio partners, KOSU, KWGS, and KCCU have launched Oklahoma Engaged: Project Public Office.

A supporter of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump at the Oklahoma Republican Party's watch party at Main Event in Oklahoma City
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

There were few surprises at the national level as Oklahoma voters overwhelmingly chose Republican nominee Donald Trump to become the 45th president of the United States.

A line forms outside the Crown Heights Christian Church in Oklahoma City shortly after 8 a.m. on Election Day, Nov. 8, 2016..
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Polls opened at 7 a.m. across Oklahoma, and the State Election Board says nearly 1,000 extra pollworkers are manning precincts today. Several polling places throughout the metro had long lines, with some voters waiting for anywhere from an hour to 90 minutes Tuesday morning.

McAlester's 4th Ward councilman Robert Karr stands in front of his home in Oct. 2016
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

After finishing up work at the airplane manufacturing plant where Robert Karr has worked for more than three decades, the McAlester city councilman drives his pickup truck around the town's 4th ward. Karr has lived in this area almost his entire life, save for six years when his family moved out of town.

 

His 4th ward roots are deep, and Karr knows his constituents well.

Santiago and Marco Arzate in the back room of their storefront property on Southwest 25th Street in Oklahoma City.
Josh Robinson / Oklahoma Engaged

As KGOU and KOSU began crafting ideas for our collaborative election project Oklahoma Engaged, we were interested in several forms of storytelling. This included informative and in-depth radio stories and video profiles of folks in a south Oklahoma City district.

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