KGOU

Claire Donnelly

KGOU Morning Edition Host and Content Creator

Claire comes to KGOU from WBEZ in Chicago, where she was an intern on the city desk. She holds a master’s degree in journalism from Northwestern University’s Medill School. Claire has reported on street performers, temp workers, criminal court cases, police dogs, Christmas tree recycling and more.

Claire went to college at the University of Virginia, where she majored in Comparative Literature and Spanish. She’s originally from Richmond, Virginia. When she’s not working, Claire loves listening to podcasts and cooking. Follow her on Twitter @donnellyclairee.

Ways to Connect

High school students pack into front row seats at the University of Oklahoma stadium in Norman on a muggy Thursday evening, set to watch the city’s biggest rivalry: the Norman High School Tigers versus the Norman North Timberwolves.

Sam Anderson, a staff writer at The New York Times Magazine, describes his debut book as "a love letter to Oklahoma City, which is the most secretly interesting place in America."

 

Oklahoma Department of Transportation

“Don’t be a stinker, use your blinker.”

 

An albino western diamondback rattlesnake is one of about 35 reptiles on exhibit at the OKC Rattlesnake Museum.
Claire Donnelly / KGOU

A museum showcasing some of the nation’s deadliest snakes opened Wednesday in Oklahoma City.

My Second Closet in downtown Wewoka sells new and gently-used clothing to everyone “from fashionistas to cowboys,” says owner Kay Wallace.
Claire Donnelly / Oklahoma Engaged

Kay Wallace holds up a denim Gucci jumpsuit as she sorts through a pile of clothes behind the counter of her shop in downtown Wewoka.

“Of course it’s not my size —it’s an extra large,” she said. “This is one of my favorites.”

The Wewoka train depot in Wewoka, Oklahoma.
Seminole Nation Museum, Wewoka, OK

Frank Baker grew up hearing his family members use a specific expression. If something was messed up or shady, they would say it was "worse than a Wewoka switch."

He asked "How Curious:" Where did this slang come from? And what is a "Wewoka switch?" 

How Curious question-asker Greg Elwell stands outside Robert's Grill in El Reno. Elwell asked How Curious if it's illegal in Oklahoma to take a bite of someone else's hamburger.
Claire Donnelly / KGOU

In our last episode, listener Greg Elwell asked How Curious if it was really illegal in Oklahoma to take a bite of someone else’s hamburger. This week, we have an update.

Robert's Grill in El Reno, Oklahoma has been serving up onion burgers like this one since 1926.
Claire Donnelly / KGOU

Many lists of unusual state statutes say it's against the law in Oklahoma to take a bite of someone else's hamburger. 

KGOU listener Greg Elwell asked "How Curious:" Is this a real law?

A newspaper advertisement for the Russian Dream House printed in The Oklahoman, September 1963.
The Oklahoman Digital Archives / The Oklahoman

A tiny "Russian Dream House" appears in an Oklahoma City neighborhood in 1963. And then it disappears. 

Dana Billingsley asked "How Curious:" What was this house? And where did it come from?

Nichols Hills City Hall under construction in 1970.
D. Heaton / Oklahoma Publishing Company Photography Collection, Oklahoam Historical Society

The City of Nichols Hills takes up approximately two square miles within the Oklahoma City city limits. It's home to about 3,700 people.

 

KGOU listener Marcella Meade asked “How Curious:” where did the name Nichols Hills come from?

Angler Billy Nabors catches a state record 98 pound blue catfish with a rod and line in Lake Texoma, November 2004.
Oklahoma Department of Wildlife / wildlifedepartment.com

A catfish the size of a bus lurking in the deep waters of Lake Texoma, with eyes as big as a Volkswagen Beetle’s headlights.

 

Steven Neal heard this rumor and asked “How Curious:” Is it true?

 

Former Oklahoma City mayor George Shirk examines an old stove in the Chinese “city” under Oklahoma City, 1969.
Jim Argo / The Oklahoman

For decades, Oklahoma residents have circulated rumors about a vast network of tunnels under downtown Oklahoma city where hundreds of Chinese immigrants lived at the turn of the century.

 

KGOU listener Gypsy Hogan asked “How Curious:” did those tunnels really exist?

RepLankford / Flickr Public Domain

United States lawmakers are in recess this week after failing to pass three approaches to making the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program permanent. The DACA program protects from deportation immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

The September 27, 2015 "super blood moon."
Casey Davis / NASA

Early-rising Oklahomans will have the chance to view a total lunar eclipse Wednesday morning.

 

Paul L. McCord, Jr. / Flickr.com

The NBA season is about halfway over and the Oklahoma City Thunder are not performing as well as fans had hoped.

 

KGOU's Claire Donnelly spoke with Jon Hamm, who writes about the Thunder for Bleacher Report and co-hosts the Thunder podcast OKC Dream Team, about the team's struggles, playoff chances and more.  

 

KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley outside the building.
Claire Donnelly / KGOU

Restoration work is ongoing at the Oklahoma state capitol.

 

Recently, project manager Trait Thompson led KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol news director Shawn Ashley on a tour of the building.

St. Gregory's University in Shawnee, a private Catholic liberal arts university founded in 1875
Claire Donnelly / KGOU

Oklahoma’s only Catholic university is shutting its doors at the end of the fall semester.

Norman water
Claire Donnelly / KGOU

Many Norman residents say they have noticed an earthy smell and taste in the city’s tap water. Ken Komiske, the city’s utilities director, explains the reasons for the change.

InSapphoWeTrust / Flickr

The Oklahoma state Supreme Court ruled Thursday a sales tax on motor vehicles is constitutional.

Baseball
Claire Donnelly / KGOU

This week's summer sound features members of the Oklahoma Vortex youth baseball team: Gabe, Chance, Diego, Matt, Toby, Mason, William, Hudson, Bryce, Cantyn and Braden. It was recorded in Moore. 

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