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Members of the Oklahoma Ethics Commission meet Friday in Oklahoma City.
Catherine Sweeney / The Journal Record

Transparency Vs. Privacy: Ethics Commission Sparks Debate After Proposed Rule Change

In this week's episode of the Business Intelligence Report, Journal Record editor Russell Ray discusses a recent proposal by the Oklahoma Ethics Commission, which, if approved, would allow the agency to begin controlling so-called indirect lobbying. A rule change that Ray says "has sparked a heated debate over the need for transparency versus the need for privacy."

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Much-loved poet Mary Oliver died Thursday of lymphoma, at her home in Florida. She was 83. Oliver won many awards for her poems, which often explore the link between nature and the spiritual world; she also won a legion of loyal readers who found both solace and joy in her work.

While the longest government shutdown in U.S. history continues, President Trump's approval rating is down, and there are cracks showing with his base.

A new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds Trump's approval rating down and his disapproval rating up from a month ago. He currently stands at 39 percent approve, 53 percent disapprove — a 7-point net change from December when his rating was 42 percent approve, 49 percent disapprove.

Want to reduce your risk of dementia in older age? Move as much as you can.

We've all heard about techniques to get us more physically active — take the stairs, park the car a bit further from your destination, get up and march in place for a minute or two when standing or sitting at a desk.

Now a study finds even simple housework like cooking or cleaning may make a difference in brain health in our 70s and 80s.

Updated at 8:59 p.m. ET

Officials leasing the Old Post Office Building for the Trump International Hotel in Washington improperly ignored the Constitution's anti-corruption clauses when they continued to lease the government property to President Trump even after he won the White House, according to an internal federal government watchdog.

Updated at 5:42 p.m. ET

Four Americans were killed in an explosion while conducting a routine patrol in northern Syria, according to the Pentagon. The Islamic State has claimed responsibility.

Two U.S. service members, one civilian employee of the Defense Intelligence Agency and one contractor working as an interpreter died in the attack in Manbij. Three service members were injured.

A Washington, D.C., judge ruled Tuesday that furloughed federal workers who are not getting paid because of a government shutdown must continue to do their jobs.

It's a setback for the workers who brought the lawsuit against the Trump administration.

"Calling people back to work, as the federal government is doing, without paying them is unlawful," attorney Gregory O'Duden tells NPR. O'Duden is general counsel for the National Treasury Employees Union that brought the suit in consolidation with a claim from the National Air Traffic Controllers Association.

One of the last remaining Navajo Code Talkers, who relayed messages that were never decoded by enemies in World War II, has died at age 94.

Alfred Newman died Sunday afternoon at a New Mexico nursing home, one of his sons, Kevin Newman, tells NPR.

He says his father was a quiet yet courageous man. "My dad told me that the U.S. was in trouble and when they were calling for him, he needed to answer that call with the armed forces," he says.

KGOU Radio

This is the Manager’s Minute.

The work is complete on KGOU’s annual audit. KGOU business manager Cindy Cottrell and our auditors worked together since late November to make sure the audit is accurate and clean.

The audit is required by the University of Oklahoma and is necessary for KGOU to keep receiving critical funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. The audit is one of the CPB requirements that we must comply with each year. Others include preparing a Station Activity Survey, complying with CPB underwriting rules and completing anti-harassment training.

Updated at 5:08 p.m. ET

A federal judge in New York has ruled against the Trump administration's decision to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census.

U.S. District Judge Jesse Furman ordered the administration to stop its plans to include the controversial question on forms for the upcoming national head count "without curing the legal defects" the judge identified in his 277-page opinion released on Tuesday.

view of the US Capitol dome through trees
Liam James Doyle / NPR

The Senate is holding confirmation hearings this week for President Trump's pick to run the Justice Department. William Barr is the nominee to be the next Attorney General. Lawmakers are questioning his views on the Special Counsel's Russia investigation, whether a sitting president can be indicted, and other matters.

The hearing is scheduled to begin at 9:30 a.m. ET (8:30 CT). If video does not begin playing, please refresh the page.

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