Elizabeth Warren | KGOU
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Elizabeth Warren

AP Photo/Matthew Putney

This time last week Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren campaigned in Iowa after announcing her presidential bid. Her announcement came a few months after the Oklahoma-native released DNA test results to back up claims of Native American ancestry. The test was taken as an affront to many Native Americans, especially Cherokee citizens, one of the tribes Warren claims ties to.

Elizabeth Warren speaks at the Democratic National Convention on Sept. 5, 2012 in Charlotte, N.C.
Joe Raedle / Getty Images

It was April 15, 2009, in the depths of the financial crisis. Elizabeth Warren was backstage at The Daily Show, about to make her national TV debut, but her head was not in the clouds.

It was in the toilet. She was throwing up.

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren became an unlikely media star following the 2008 financial crisis.

She was a plainspoken law professor from Harvard who advocated on behalf of families and consumers affected by the Wall Street meltdown.

Warren was brought to Washington to help monitor the multibillion-dollar bank bailout package.

As part of that work, Warren helped to create the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau — a watchdog agency that oversees and enforces consumer finance laws.