COVID-19: Resources | KGOU
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COVID-19: Resources

Credit NIAID-RML

Resources and links to information about the novel coronavirus COVID-19

Oklahoma State Department of Health's Vaccination Portal: https://vaccinate.oklahoma.gov

Fact vs. Rumor: FEMA's Coronavirus Rumor Control

World Health Organization (WHO) - COVID-19 Outbreak

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) - Coronavirus

CDC Guidance for Businesses and Employers

National Institutes for Health (NIH) (NIAID) - Coronaviruses

Johns Hopkins University  Global case tracker, daily reports, FAQs with experts, and more

National Jewish Health pulmonary medical center

U.S. Small Business Administration

Oklahoma Resources:

Oklahoma State Department of Health's Vaccination Portal: https://vaccinate.oklahoma.gov

Oklahoma State Department of Health - Color-coded COVID-19 Alert System (Map)

Oklahoma State Department of Health - COVID-19 Outbreak

Integris Health symptom checker

Oklahoma City/County Health Dept. Hotline for the Uninsured or those without a primacy care physician:  (405) 425-4489

Data Source: Acute Disease Service, Oklahoma State Department of Health.

OU Medicine - COVID-19

The Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma encourages anyone needing food assistance to visit rfbo.org/get-help or call (405) 972-1111

University of Oklahoma Coronavirus Resources

Norman Chamber of Commerce resources for businesses

Latest News:

NPR Special Series: The Coronavirus Crisis

Coronavirus around the world: The latest from the BBC

APM Research Lab: COVID-19 Deaths by Race and Ethnicity in the U.S.

A letter Jan Cervenka wrote StateImpact included a complaint he filed with the Federal Bureau of Prisons and several of Great Plains' internal memorandums
Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Testing, masking, and quarantine standards are a few of the concerns Jan Cervenka has with the COVID-19 response at Great Plains Correctional Facility in Hinton.

The number of Americans filing for new state unemployment benefits dipped to 900,000 — down from the previous week but still high by historical standards, signaling the economic challenges facing the Biden administration.

The latest weekly data from the Labor Department was likely distorted somewhat by the ebb and flow of government relief programs, but the overall picture continues to show a struggling U.S. job market as President Biden takes office.

This vile of the COVID-19 Pfizer vaccine is said to contain five doses but health care workers say they can often get six doses by tapping the syringe to remove bubbles and carefully measuring each dose.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

The Oklahoma Department of Corrections expects to start administering COVID-19 vaccine doses next month, director Scott Crow said Wednesday during an agency board meeting. 

Updated at 10:06 a.m. ET

"I am honored to announce that the United States will remain a member of the World Health Organization," Dr. Anthony Fauci said Thursday, informing the WHO's executive board that President Biden has reversed former President Donald Trump's move to leave the U.N.'s health agency.

The U.S. will also fulfill its financial obligations to the WHO, Fauci, chief medical adviser to the president, said, as well as cease a drawdown of U.S. staff who work with the organization.

A growing number of grocers are adopting a novel approach in the race to get their workers vaccinated against COVID-19: providing pay incentives.

Aldi this week became the latest grocery chain to offer employees compensation for getting vaccinated, saying it would provide workers with two hours of pay for each of the two vaccine doses.

The grocer also promised workers receiving vaccines that they would not lose pay for missed hours from work and that it would help pay for the shots.

The devastating fall and winter wave of coronavirus infections that is causing so much misery across the U.S. appears to have finally peaked, according to several researchers who are closely tracking the virus.

While another surge remains possible, especially with new, more infectious variants on the horizon, the number of new daily infections in the current wave appears to have hit a high in the past week or two and has been steadily declining in most states since, the researchers say.

Updated at 3:36 p.m. ET

President Biden signed a series of orders and directives on his second day in office to take charge of stopping the spread of the coronavirussteps that he and his advisers say will start to boost testing, vaccinations, supplies and treatments.

Most of us don't have to think too often about the logistics of dying and about what closure, like wakes, funerals, memorials, actually requires.

But Todd Beckley has to. The Los Angeles County-area funeral director says he's never experienced anything like the coronavirus pandemic. He says that Inglewood Cemetery Mortuary where he works is so overwhelmed, they're using "every embalming table, every gurney, every table."

And there is a waiting list 23 families long.

The night before their inauguration, Joe Biden and Kamala Harris stood near the Lincoln Memorial and marked more than 400,000 people killed by the coronavirus. On Wednesday, the Biden administration takes responsibility for fighting the pandemic.

Maine health officials discovered that a majority of Moderna vaccine shipments received across the state on Monday were not kept adequately cold during transport, meaning 4,400 doses may have to be thrown out.

Dr. Nirav Shah, director of the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention, made the announcement during a "sad and somber" coronavirus briefing on Tuesday and said the problem extends to other states as well.

Updated at 5:52 p.m. ET

Four-hundred lights around the Lincoln Memorial's reflecting pool were lit Tuesday evening to honor the 400,000 people in the U.S. who have died from COVID-19.

President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris both spoke.

While millions wait for a lifesaving shot, the U.S. death toll from the coronavirus continues to soar upward with horrifying speed. On Tuesday, the last full day of Donald Trump's presidency, the official death count reached 400,000 — a once-unthinkable number. More than 100,000 Americans have perished in the pandemic in just the past five weeks.

In Los Angeles County, an environmental regulator has temporarily relaxed limits on the number of cremations that can be performed each month, citing a backlog caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

Janet Yellen, President-elect Joe Biden's nominee to lead the Treasury Department, made the case for aggressive economic relief, urging lawmakers to "act big" to fight the financial fallout from the coronavirus pandemic.

At her confirmation hearing Tuesday before the Senate Finance Committee, Yellen pressed lawmakers to pass the $1.9 trillion spending package that the incoming administration has proposed to keep families and businesses afloat as well as to accelerate vaccinations against COVID-19.

COVID-19 Causes Unexpected Dip In OKCPD’s Mental Health Calls

Jan 18, 2021
Master Sgt. Corey Nooner, is one of Oklahoma City's first officers trained in crisis intervention. Nooner said he assists other officers with mental health calls across the city.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

Despite projections, Oklahoma City Police responded to fewer mental health calls in 2020 than the previous year. 

Just over a year after the world's first coronavirus cases were identified in China, the country's economy has bounced back from the ravages of the pandemic.

China's economy grew by 2.3% last year, according to data published Monday by the country's National Bureau of Statistics. The steady economic recovery was largely expected, and puts China on a track that other countries haven't achieved.

A California man was arrested Saturday and accused of hiding in a restricted area of Chicago's O'Hare International Airport for three months. The man told police that COVID-19 had rendered him too scared to travel home to California, so he hid in the airport, surviving on food provided by strangers, The Associated Press reported.

Updated at 11:45 a.m. ET

Rebekah Jones, the data scientist who helped create Florida's COVID-19 dashboard, has turned herself in to police, in response to an arrest warrant issued by the state.

Jones is charged with one count of "offenses against users of computers, computer systems, computer networks and electronic devices," the Florida Department of Law Enforcement said in a statement Monday.

Last spring, the pandemic stole Maddie Harvey's job on campus in the Dean of Students office. She was finishing up her senior year at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minn., and without the income from her job, she wasn't going to have enough money to pay her upcoming tuition bill.

"It was definitely a very vulnerable situation that I was in," says Harvey, "it's not easy to talk about when you're struggling, especially knowing that so many people were struggling at one time."

Cheers erupted in hospital wards across India on Saturday as a first group of nurses and sanitation workers rolled up their sleeves and got vaccinated against COVID-19, at the start of what's likely to become the biggest national vaccination campaign in history.

India aims to vaccinate 300 million people by July, though it could take an additional two or more years to inoculate all nearly 1.4 billion Indians. The shots are voluntary. Hospitals and clinics have been setting up and rehearsing for weeks.

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