Allison Herrera | KGOU
KGOU

Allison Herrera

Allison Herrera joined KOSU in November 2015, after serving as the editor of the award-winning online publication the Twin Cities Daily Planet.

Since earning a B.A. in journalism from the University of Minnesota, she has worked as a radio and video producer for various public radio and television stations throughout Minnesota, including Northern Wilds Media, AmpersKFAIWTIPand several others.

She recently worked with KBFT radio on the Bois Forte Band of Chippewa reservation in northern Minnesota to produce a series of shows about art, culture, history and the environment.

Allison is currently completing a documentary about Native American painter Jim Denomie and lives in Minneapolis with her daughter, Anna.

Cancer Treatment Centers of America

The Muscogee Nation will be purchasing the recently closed Cancer Treatment Centers of America facility located in South Tulsa.

The Cherokee Nation held tribal council elections on June 5th, which drew 38 candidates for 8 districts and one at-large seat.

Sterling Cosper

The Muscogee Nation approved legislation last week to add a ballot question that could strengthen the tribal nation's free press protections.

The ballot question asks citizens of the Muscogee Nation if they want to make free press protections permanent.

In 2018, Muscogee Media, the tribal nation's news outlet, had their free press protections revoked until July of last year, when it was reinstated.

Screenshot/C-SPAN

President Joe Biden came to Tulsa on Tuesday to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre, arguably the worst racist attack in American history.

Biden toured the Greenwood Cultural Center, the institution that preserves the heritage of the prosperous community known as Black Wall Street. He also spoke with the three living survivors of the massacre.

It's a Friday night and the parking lot of the River Spirit Casino near downtown Tulsa, Okla., is already bustling with traffic and people headed into the casino for a night out.

"The handcuffs represent law enforcement, but the rose is to show my softer side," explained Lighthorse Police Ofcr. Amy Bennett. She's 48 with straight blonde hair pulled back into a ponytail and tattoos, including a pair of handcuffs with a rose threaded through inked down both arms. She heads out on the first call of the night.

Provided

The Cherokee Nation is receiving $1.8 billion in COVID-19 recovery funds as part of investment in Indian Country through President Biden’s American Rescue Plan Act.

The Osage Nation in northeastern Oklahoma is one of about a dozen tribal nations in the U.S. that has significant oil and gas reserves. The reserves are key to the tribe's economy, and its citizens are optimistic that newly-confirmed Interior Secretary Deb Haaland will help them continue to prosper.

The seat of Osage Nation is the community of Pawhuska, home to millions of acres of tallgrass prairie. That's where 72-year-old Julie Malone lives.