KGOU

Weather and Climate

Weather in Oklahoma can be extreme and dangerous. KGOU is committed to providing resources for being aware of the potential for weather events, continuous coverage when severe weather strikes, and a big-picture view of weather trends and topics.

Our partners in weather coverage are the National Weather Service for forecasts, experts at the National Weather Center, located at the campus of the University of Oklahoma, and for severe weather outbreaks, KOCO-TV's live continuous coverage.

Ways to Connect

Updated at 3:20 p.m. ET

As floodwaters begin to recede, Vice President Pence announced in a tweet that he would visit Nebraska on Tuesday to take stock of the devastation.

His visit comes as 74 cities, 65 counties and four tribal areas have declared states of emergency in Nebraska, according to the Nebraska Emergency Management Agency.

Updated 12:15 p.m. ET Monday

Rescuers in eastern Alabama combed through the debris from homes ripped apart by powerful tornadoes that swept through the area on Sunday, killing at least 23 people.

Lee County Sheriff Jay Jones confirmed to media outlets Sunday the number of dead. He told The Associated Press late Sunday evening that children are among the dead, and that it is possible that the death toll could continue to rise.

Lee County is located in the east central part of the state, along the border with Georgia.

Florida is a land of sun and surf. Though as the climate continues to change, the “land” part of that equation becomes more tenuous.

As The Washington Post reported in 2017:

The Climate For Climate Politics In 2019

Feb 5, 2019

With guest host Indira Lakshmanan.

Even though the Midwest has been gripped by the icy polar vortex, that doesn’t mean climate change isn’t happening, despite what you may see on Twitter.

Meteorological Electronics Technician Kirk Wilson eyes the top of a 30-foot tower as he prepares to replace a wind sensor at an Oklahoma Mesonet station near Shawnee, Okla.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Scientists are getting better and better data on the earth's changing climate. Now there's a push to take advantage of the information stream to help us cope with the extremes we know are coming. One leader in this is Oklahoma.

Eh Pree (middle) and her brother, Gala Soe, at their family home in Guymon, Oklahoma.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Gala Soe and his family sit on their living room floor, watching his infant daughter play with bright plastic balls on a colorful mat. Portraits of family members line the walls of their trailer.

A storm that brought more than an inch of rain in an hour on Thursday afternoon has triggered flash flooding in places hit by the massive Camp Fire in Northern California, sending trees toppling and stranding motorists caught in high waters, according to officials.

Cal Fire spokesman Rick Carhart said the department had activated swift water rescue teams to save multiple people caught in flooded roads.

"We have responded to reports of a number of stranded vehicles in the roadways," Carhart said.

CBS journalist Lesley Stahl interviewed President Trump this weekend. She asked him about climate change. Here’s what happened next.(We know this excerpt is long. Hang in there.)

Lesley Stahl: Do you still think that climate change is a hoax?

The United Nations says “we’ll need to cut emissions by half before 2030 and go carbon-neutral by 2050,” according to a new report. At least, that’s how Wired summarized.

The governor of North Carolina said on Sunday that Hurricane Florence “has never been more dangerous than it is right now.” At least 17 deaths have been attributed to the storm.

Benji and Lori White in a pasture at their ranch near Putnam, Okla.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Benji White pulls into a field and honks his horn. Before the shifter hits park and the doors close behind him and his wife Lori, the silver Ford pickup is surrounded by dozens of Red Angus eager for a handout of cattle cake, a protein-dense pellet.

A new study published in The New England Journal of Medicine places the death toll in Puerto Rico from Hurricane Maria at 4,645. That’s far higher than the government’s official count: 64 people. The report, done by researchers at Harvard, follows other studies and reports that said over 1,000 people died.

A fence in a field near Hooker, Oklahoma on May 12, 2018.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Last month was the hottest May on record in Oklahoma. Preliminary data from the Mesonet indicates May finished with a statewide average of 74.6 degrees. That breaks the previous record of 74 degrees, which was set in May 1962.

National Weather Service

Marvin Haworth walks through a house frame that’s under construction in the Seiter Farms development in Moore, Oklahoma.

“You see these hurricane clips right there? You see one at every rafter in the house. They’re all tied to the wall, so that rafter cannot be pulled loose from the wall,” Haworth says as he points toward the connection between the frame’s walls and roof.

Architect Gary Armbruster of MA+ Architecture designed Canadian Valley Technology Center's new campus in El Reno.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Preschool students run tiny hands through a plastic tub of little blue beads that look like fish. They then scurry across the room to sing “The wheels on the bus” with their classmates.

It’s a bright, colorful, happy room here at the Canadian Valley Technical Center’s Child Development Center in El Reno, Oklahoma. And just a few steps down the hall, child care director Barbi Slimp opens the door to another room that’s just as cheerful.

Marvin Haworth stands outside a home his business is constructing in Moore, Oklahoma on May 14, 2018.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Marvin Haworth walks through a house frame that’s under construction in the Seiter Farms development in Moore, Oklahoma.

“You see these hurricane clips right there? You see one at every rafter in the house. They’re all tied to the wall, so that rafter cannot be pulled loose from the wall,” Haworth says as he points toward the connection between the frame’s walls and roof.

National Weather Service

Severe weather is expected across much of western and central Oklahoma today, mainly in the afternoon, evening and overnight.

After one of the most destructive hurricane seasons ever, the names of four hurricanes are being retired. The World Meteorological Organization, the international body responsible for naming hurricanes, says it will no longer use Harvey, Irma, Maria and Nate to name hurricanes. The organization says it retires names for hurricanes when "a storm is so deadly or costly that the future use of its name on a different storm would be inappropriate for reasons of sensitivity."

José López doesn't have a deed for the little house at the edge of a dairy farm where he was raised and still lives — only the stories his grandfather told him about how the house came to be.

It began with an agreement between gentlemen 39 years ago. His grandfather, a foreman on the farm, needed a house for his recently divorced daughter, López's mother. So he asked the farm's owner if he could have a little corner of the sprawling estate to build her one.

"My grandfather worked on the farm for 44 years," López said, "and his boss was a good man. He said yes."

National Weather Service

Another round of freezing rain could add another layer of ice across Oklahoma on Thursday. It will be the third wave of freezing rain in as many days.

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